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Matariki ki Whaingaroa 2024

The large cluster of stars known as Matariki has a rich history and cultural significance in Aotearoa. Some consider the full name for the cluster to be ‘Ngā Mata o te Ariki Tāwhirimātea’ (the eyes of the god Tāwhirimātea). Tāwhirimātea became so angry when his siblings separated their parents, Ranginui and Papatūānuku, that he tore out his eyes, hurling them into the sky where they landed on the chest of Ranginui.

In Aotearoa the Matariki star cluster rises in midwinter, heralding seasonal change and the start of a new year. Island nations across the Pacific also use Matariki as the name for this star cluster. Cultural traditions across the world know Matariki as Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, or Subaru, and also in many places use the Matariki cluster to mark seasonal change.

Iwi and hapū across Aotearoa understand and celebrate Matariki in different ways and at different times. Matariki is a time to acknowledge those who have passed as their spirits are released into the sky as stars. The different stars in the Matariki cluster are also associated with the various domains from where we source our food. 

Matariki reaffirms the concept of whakapapa – the interconnectedness of all living things, and the relationship with our environment. Matariki is a time to reflect, share kai, give thanks, plan ahead and focus on our collective wellbeing. The introduction of the Matariki public holiday in 2022 means everyone can celebrate Matariki.

Matariki ki Whaingaroa 2024, Raglan

Following the success of ‘Toitu Te Tiriti Whaingaroa Waitangi Day 2024’ we are proud to present to the community Matariki ki Whaingaroa. Inspired by the whakatauki ‘Matariki ki tua o ngā whetū – Matariki of endless possibilities’, we have created a programme of film, art and kōrero which celebrates the power of Indigenous knowledge.

Running from June 28th-July 7th at the Raglan Old School Arts Centre, we have a selection of feature and short films – all of which celebrate the power of Indigenous knowledge, and pay homage to a Matariki of endless possibilities.

This includes the award winning story of the Whanganui river ‘I am the River and the River is Me’; Te Kūmara, a beautifully crafted documentary about traditional ways of growing and storing kūmara produced by Whaingaroa’s own Te Mauri Tau; and short films by taonga pūoro artist Komako-aroha Silver.  A multi-medium exhibition by local Māori artists and collectives will fill the gallery exhibition space.

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You Can Pop In with All Your Questions

Karioi Mountain is 756m high, also known as 2,480 ft.

Putoetoe is the original name for the Raglan township.

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Updated visitor fees: Adults $5, Children $2, Pre-schoolers free.
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Weaving experiences through people and place’

Welcome to the Whāingaroa/Raglan iHub, the one stop destination for all you need to know about this beautiful place.

We are a community defined by our natural rugged landscape, our unique connection from shoreline to mountain top, inland to our gentle rolling hills, our daily lives in synchronicity with the ebb and flow of the tides and changing seasons.

This place is made up of our coastal township of Raglan and our rural communities. We are diverse, we value hapu and iwi, we are people friendly with a strong community spirit grounded firmly in taking care of each other and our environment.

We celebrate creativity; arts, music, dance, theatre, drama, education, food and innovation.

We are renowned for our world class surf breaks, however, Raglan has so much more to offer, whether you’re seeking that perfect wave, exploring our eclectic shops, browsing our numerous galleries, learning our rich history, or simply enjoying a coffee, Raglan has something just for you.

We warmly welcome you here to this place that we are blessed to call home, we ask that you love and care for our place, as we do and in return, we will take care of you.

Nau mai, haere mai ki Whāingaroa

Raglan – where Mountain meets Surf

Raglan What’s On Calendar

Raglan – where Creative Lifestyles prosper

For the full Events Calendar in and around Raglan click here.

The Whāingaroa Raglan Destination Management Organisation which manages the Raglan iHub is grateful for funding support from the following organisations:

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